Avoid These 4 Common Job Search Pitfalls
1) You don’t keep your options open
You know that old saying “several irons in the fire”? It absolutely applies to your job search. Just because you have a job interview lined up tomorrow, does not mean you are going to receive a job offer. Keep your job search momentum and schedule interviews to any opening you find appealing. If you do receive an incredible offer, what’s the worst that can happen? Yep, you cancel an interview or have a great bargaining chip.
2) You have poor business acumen
It’s pretty cool of your prospective employer to take you out to lunch during the interview process, right? Indeed it is. However, beware this could be a slick strategy to assess your business acumen – they want to see how you treat the restaurant staff and how they treat you so the “real you” comes to the surface. That can easily equate to how you will treat staff and co-workers in the office.
3) You detail too much work history
Many job seekers believe they will appear to be a stronger candidate by including more work history on a resume or during a job interview. There are several ways you can get caught in this trap. The easiest trap applies to us job seekers over 35 years old – there is no reason to include work history beyond 10 years. Another easy trap is duplicating responsibilities. For example, if you ‘reconciled accounts receivable ledgers’ at your last 3 positions, only include it once. Falling into these traps might give the perception that your career hasn’t advanced as quickly as others.
4) You neglect to search for yourself on the Internet
These days, everyone posts their day-to-day activities on social networks for the world to view. Since your would-be employer is from this world, chances are they are going to look you up. Imagine losing a potential job offer because an employer stumbled upon a picture of your recent keg stand? The worst part about it is your would-be employer will most likely not say anything so you will never know!
Effectively Answer Common Job Interview Questions
Can you tell me a little about yourself?
Do: Demonstrate self-awareness, sincerity and problem-solving prowess by mentioning one area you could use to improve and proactively describe current and future measures you are taking to overcome this weakness.
Don’t: Offer your life story, discuss how you spend your leisure time nor describe experiences in your professional career that are not relevant to the position for which you are applying.
What’s your biggest weakness?
Do: Demonstrate self-awareness, sincerity and problem-solving prowess by mentioning one area you could use to improve and proactively describe current and future measures you are taking to overcome this weakness.
Don’t: Act like you are flawless, being over-confident can ruin your rapport with many employers. Overly critiquing yourself can also show lack of confidence. Offering a core strength in an attempt to pull the old switcheroo will often backfire. Lastly, do not offer a transparently fake flaw such as “I work too hard”. Job interviewers will see right through many of these tactics.
Where do you see yourself in five years?
Do: Position yourself as realistically ambitious and most importantly flexible. Speak of your desire to continuously take on broader responsibilities as you climb up the corporate ladder one rung at a time. Emphasize your commitment to growing professionally and lifelong learning goals such as certifications, continued education and extension programs.
Don’t: Focus on impractical career objectives. Stating that you want to be the company’s next CTO when you are an entry level developer can portray the sense of unwarranted entitlement. Also steer clear of far-fetched scenarios and daydreaming – chances are you are not going to win the lottery.
Companies Now Hiring:
LJFA ATTLJFA Home DepotLJFA KaiserLJFA UPSLJFA TargetLJFA Dell
Privacy Policy | Your California Rights | Terms of Use | DMCA | Marketing Disclosure Policy | Report Spam | Unsubscribe | Become An Affiliate | Contact Us
* Source:  Click here to see the U.S. Department of Labor report.